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File picture shows Adam Adli (centre) outside the KL High Court on January 29, 2014. — Picture by Boo Su-Lyn

(Photo Courtesy of MalayMail Online)

KUALA LUMPUR, Sept 19 — The Sessions Court today found activist Adam Adli Abdul Halim guilty of sedition and sentenced him to one year in jail for a speech last year in which he is said to have called for a change of government through undemocratic means.

Adam was charged on May 23 for his May 13 remarks allegedly inciting the public to overthrow the government through street protests during a forum shortly after the May 5 general election which saw Barisan Nasional retain power narrowly.

The offence under Section 4 (1)(b) of the Sedition Act 1948 carries a maximum jail term of three years or a fine of up to RM5,000 or both.

Adam and five others – politicians Chua Tian Chang, Tamrin Ghafar and activists Hishamuddin Rais, Haris Ibrahim and Muhammad Safwan Anang – were charged last year with sedition over remarks uttered at the same forum.

On September 5, Safwan was sentenced to 10 months imprisonment after the court found him guilty of making a speech with seditious tendency at the same forum.

- See more at: http://www.themalaymailonline.com/malaysia/article/activist-adam-adli- gets-one-year-jail-after-convicted-of-sedition#sthash.nvOFlKaX.dpuf

Putrajaya should stop using the Sedition Act 1948 and other laws against politicians, activists and lawyers, and recognise the right to freedom of speech and expression, the Malaysian Bar said today.

Its president Christopher Leong (pic) said they must not use such an abhorrent piece of colonial-era legislation to protect themselves from fair comment and criticism.

“The Malaysian Bar is appalled by the unrelenting misuse of the Sedition Act 1948 and other laws to stifle speech and expression over the past four weeks,” he said in a statement today.

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This morning I attended Malaysia Day Prayer Celebration organized by National Evangelical Christian Fellowship (NECF) and Council of Churches (CCM) at Calvary Convention Centre at Bukit Jalil.

A few thousand Christians and church leaders from different denominations were present. The Christian politicians who were present included Datuk Paul Low, Hannah Yeoh, Yeo Bee Yin, Tiew Way Keng and Datuk Tan Kee Kwong.

We had praise and worship, and we prayed together for various issues and people, including the King, PM, Cabinet members to rule the country with righteousness and justice, we prayed for the civil service, and prayed for 5.2 millions of migrants and refugees in the country and others.
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Malam ini, 15 September 2014, saya dijemput untuk berucap di forum Gerakan Mansuhkan Akta Hasutan anjuran SUARAM dan beberapa kumpulan lain di Dewan Perhimpunan Cina KL Selangor.

Lebih kurang 15 penceramah dijemput berucap di forum pada malam In, antaranya Lim Kit Siang, Mat Sabu, bekas MB Perak Nizar Jamaluddin, bekas Timbalan Menteri UMNO Dato Saifuddin Abdullah dan lain-lain.

Setiap penceramah diminta berucap 2 minit sahaja. Dalam ucapan saya, saya kata saya mungkin perlu rasa bangga kerana saya ialah wanita yang pertama didakwa di bawah Akta Hasutan, dan juga kes pertama di mana seseorang didakwa kerana satira politik yang dirakam dalam bentuk klip video.

Pressure from some groups, rather than the strict application of the law, could be behind Tan Sri Abdul Gani Patail’s move to frame sedition charges against opposition leaders and activists, says a former Attorney-General.

Former A-G Tan Sri Abu Talib Othman cited the example of Seri Delima state assemblyman R.S.N. Rayer, who was charged with two counts of sedition recently.

Talib pointed out that there was a lot of criticism against Gani when Rayer, the Penang assemblyman, was initially brought to court, but was not charged.

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Last week, I joined Lim Kit Siang to meet with Malaysian diaspora and students in Shanghai and Beijing. A few months ago, he had received an invitation from some Malaysians under the name of Bersih Shanghai residing in China to talk about political development in Malaysia.

LKS’s daughter Hui Ying joined us on the trip. She was responsible for taking care of her father during our sight seeing:-)

LKS almost wanted to abort the trip to China a few days before departure as he was worried about the situation in Pakatan Selangor. However, he then changed his mind and decided to go through the supposedly relaxing programmes in China. As expected, he had to be on the phone a lot to keep in touch with the development in Selangor even during sight-seeing :-))

I must say we had good dialogue sessions with the Malaysian diaspora and students in Shanghai and Beijing. Some of them were impressed with and moved by our Impian Sarawak and Impian Sabah projects in the interior areas of East Malaysia and had expressed interest to participate in the projects.

We had also met with Malay and Indian Malaysian students who are studying in Beijing. However, some of the Malay students were advised not to meet us by their Malaysian “advisor’ who supervises them in Beijing. Why did this advisor advise them not to meet their country MPs? How sad can that be? :-((

Some of the Malaysians working in China expressed intention to come back to work in Malaysia although they enjoy good income in China. They said money is not everything; they want to come back to Malaysia to serve and to bring change which will benefit the nation and Malaysians.

LKS expressed great hope on the Malaysian Diaspora. He hoped they can get together to impact change in Malaysia.

He was satisfied with the trip as a whole.


KUALA LUMPUR, Sept 8 — A Malaysia Day video showing Malaysians refusing to say racist things for money has gone viral on social media with many users, including some known personalities, admitting they shed tears after watching it, and that it gave them hope for the future.

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Malaysians are finding themselves at odds with each other due to a lack of trust in the country’s politicians and public institutions, an academic said today.

Dr Helen Ting of Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia’s Institute for Malaysian and International Studies said the problem was the weak political culture, where politicians do not care about how the public perceive them, even when they appear to be inconsistent.

“They are not shy to do that when they feel that their political survival is at stake. So, the priority is their survival, not principles, and not the feeling that ‘it is shameful for me if I am not principled or if I am not consistent’, she said

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